Before Abbot Kinney was littered with decadent shops and gourmet cafes, it once belonged to the bohemians, green space, and the eccentrics. The boulevard’s galleries showcased the neighborhood talent, and praised itself for being an artist’s refuge from materialistic L.A.

Lucky for us, the hyper-gentrification didn’t sell all the soul from Abbot-Kinney. In some unexpected nooks and crannies, there is some art lurking in the open. I almost missed The Chaplin Zoetrope, if my lovely friend had not pointed out to me as I was walking into traffic.

 

While I was searching for the name of the person responsible for saving my inattentive heinie, my eyes landed on the stack of informative cards perched under the exhibit. The card’s map specified all the public art in the area, along with a web address of other projects that all art-appreciating Angelenos should be aware of.

 

A map to several pots of gold

 

On the reverse, the numbers explain each installation, with their whereabouts included. Thanks to Robin Murez, who commenced the Venice public art project in 2005,  she hoped to inspire a sense of community amongst all the various citizens dwelling in the Venice area. Along with unifying the residents, Robin wanted bring about a sense of wonderment and delight with each piece.

A list...of visual treasures.

 

They are always open to suggestions, and needing assistance with: locating sites, creating, inviting, organizing, installing, landscaping, CAD drawings, permits, funding, photographing, and media.

While I’m crafting my thank you card, I recommend investigating these visual treasure troves before they’re bulldozed for a new Prada store.

Website: www.venicepublicart.com

The Gentle Barn

Sundays are often reserved for sleeping through all of your meager time away from the office. Yawning, you consider an indulgent beach day, so you could even out that driver’s tan. But on second thought, slathering on SPF 1000 has inspired a change of plan. There’s a place above in the canyons that is home to abused/neglected farm animals that are rehabilitated, is open for pettings to the public only on Sundays.

Sassy prefers a massage while she sunbathes.

Sassy prefers a massage while she sunbathes.

The Gentle Barn was started by Ellie Laks, in 1999, in Tarzana, CA. It was a dream of hers since the tender age of 7. Animals were a constant source of comfort to her throughout her childhood. Jay Weiner, who felt similarly, decided to volunteer, then joined forces with Ellie. Together, they relocated the Gentle Barn from a half-acre property, to a sprawling six acres, in Santa Clarita, CA. Their ultimate dream is to open Gentle Barns across the nation, to provide healing and safety to all animals and children. The animals are often paired up with children who’s stories mirrors theirs: abuse, neglect, ect. The children find in the animals a source of hope, a future of healing, and a new friend.

Snuggle Claire as she gobbles sweetly in your ear.

Snuggle Claire as she gobbles sweetly in your ear.

Luckily, the Gentle Barn is opened on Sundays to the public, so you can cuddle Claire, scratch Sassy the Goat, or even get a hug from a cow.

Hug, brush, or snuggle, will bring an approving nuzzle.

Hug, brush, or snuggle, will bring an approving nuzzle.

If you want to begin to frequent this barnyard snuggle fest, you can buy a season pass for $50.00. It will buy you admission, a popcorn, and a bottle of water. You can walk right in after you sign in. No waiting in line, so you don’t have to arrive to a bunch of cranky carrot craving horses. What I also enjoy is that they offer vegan hot dogs, and other nice nibbles for purchase. There is also an option of bringing your own picnic lunch, but please note: they request that you do not bring meat or dairy onto the premises in respect of the animals. Parking is also free, and it is on a gravel lot, so leave your Sunday’s finest at home.

 

 

The Gentle Barn

15825 Sierra Highway

Santa Clarita, CA 91390

Open on Sundays to the Public: 10am – 2pm

Admission: $10.00

Phone: 661-252-2440